4wt or 5wt help me spend money.

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Danielocean, Jul 1, 2013.

  1. Danielocean Steelhead Virgin

    Posts: 1,497
    Monroe
    Ratings: +663 / 0
    I am looking at getting a good rod for the Cedar river, and the Snoqualmie forks. Would you guys suggest a 4wt setup or a 5wt setup. I know that the 5 is the most all round rod but could it be too much rod for these particular bodies of water.
  2. Steve Unwin Active Member

    Posts: 343
    Edmonds, WA
    Ratings: +93 / 0
    I'd vote for 4wt for the Snoqualmie forks. I've been out with my 6wt which is much too big but all I had; I think a 5wt would be okay but not great. But if you wanted to use it for stillwater in the future the 5 might be a better choice.
  3. Olive bugger Active Member

    Posts: 2,494
    Woodinville, WA
    Ratings: +438 / 0
    I do not mean to be hostile to your inquiry but your question is a lot like asking how long is a piece of string.

    I guess it would depend on where you fish mostly, and what you fish for. I would not buy a good rod just for one or two rivers unless I fished them exclusively. Flyfishing is a very accomodating sport. Unless you grossly overweight the equations you can fish either a four or a five weight for most any river in the state. There are a few exceptions. But even fishing the Columbia, there are places where a four weight might be just the ticket.

    I have not fished the two rivers that you mentioned, but I am familiar with them and I know their sizes. I would think it would be a personal preference and either weight of rod would be just fine.

    Tactics are a whole new ball game.
  4. Danielocean Steelhead Virgin

    Posts: 1,497
    Monroe
    Ratings: +663 / 0
    Olive,

    You are a very hostile person LOL just kidding. Actually thank you very much for you insight. I actually only plan on fishing these bodies of water exclusively for the time being. So with that said I am in the air between the two. I am guess that if I go with the 4 wt I will not be fishing streamers at all. Correct me if I am wrong please. Thank you again.
  5. Olive bugger Active Member

    Posts: 2,494
    Woodinville, WA
    Ratings: +438 / 0
    Well, hostile or not, I have never owned a 4 wt, I am a 5 wt fisher.
    Have never found myself to be under powered or over gunned for the trout in these waters. Now if I were going after steelies or bass, I would opt for a bigger gun.

    So I do not feel qualified to give you sound advice on a 4 wt. and besides being hostile, I am just plain mean and lazy. LOL
    NWstonefly and Danielocean like this.
  6. BDD Active Member

    Posts: 2,238
    Ellensburg, WA
    Ratings: +223 / 2
    If I were primarily throwing dry flies on the two rivers you mention, then I'd go with the 4 weight. If I were throwing more streamers and/or double nymph rigs, then I'd go with the 5 weight. With that, I have never fished the Cedar but have fished the Sno and its forks.
  7. shadowcast Member

    Posts: 116
    Ratings: +19 / 0
    No way to answer that without a lot more info. Keep in mind 80-90% of what you'll catch in the Cedar is 6-12". Given that, even my medium 4wt Winston is like bringing CIWS to a knife fight . Hell, I've caught 20+ " browns with it no problem. I say get a 3wt. You'll have a hell of a lot more fun. Get a four wt anyway too.
  8. Gary Knowels Active Member

    Posts: 1,113
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +418 / 0
    I'd go for a 4 weight. 8'-8'6". Medium-moderate fast action. That only limits your choice to about 50 rods, go test them out and have fun finding your next toy.

    Sent from my HTC_Amaze_4G
  9. golfman44 Coho Queen

    Posts: 1,773
    Kirkland
    Ratings: +1,087 / 0
    Hey bud. If you're ONLY wanting to fish those rivers you can get a 3 wt even. That being said, if you ever want to fish for SRC, stillwater, or other fun things then a 5 wt would be far and away your best bet. I fish my 5 on the sno forks and sure the fish aren't much match for it but then again you aren't really chasing 6-10" trout for the fight. You can still delicately present super small dry Flys with a 5wt just fine.

    I guess it comes down to if you go with a 3/4wt you are more optimally geared for those rivers but you eliminate yourself from fishing other areas within reason. Can't go wrong either way I guess!
  10. Skyler Evans Active Member

    Posts: 223
    Fort Lewis
    Ratings: +33 / 0
    I enjoyed using my 4wt on the cedar i still over powered the fish a little bit but it was more fun than my 5wt would have been and having a shorter rod made it a bit easier for me to stay out of the trees above the water.
  11. troutdopemagic Active Member

    Posts: 413
    Lake Stevens, Washington
    Ratings: +136 / 0
    I only own one five weight and instead use 4's for my average trout fishing, then I have a 7 I use for streamers and hopper/heavy double nymphs. Don't really have any reason for not fishing a 5 weight, probably because I prefer the light rod for dries and I try not to use heavy double or triple nymph rigs as often.

    That being said, if I'm starting out in the trout world and only want one rod, I'd get a medium action 9 foot 5 weight mid priced rod from any of the reputable brands. There's a reason why thats the standard. It will do anything well, streamers, heavy nymphs, dries, droppers, etc .
    Olive bugger likes this.
  12. Stew McLeod aka BigMac

    Posts: 1,180
    Renton, WA
    Ratings: +90 / 0
    I'd vote for a three 3 wt. I do 90% of my fishing on the Cedar and sno forks. I find the finesse dry fly presentations I can get with the 3wt are worth the lighter rod.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
  13. Kyle Smith Active Member

    Posts: 2,010
    Bozeman, MT
    Ratings: +282 / 0
    Because the Cedar is a far better nymphing river than it is for dry flies, I would recommend a 9 footer for line control. Probably a 4 weight, way more fun for little cutties than a 5 but strong enough to overline and throw a thingmabobber on the Yak. I fish a 9' 4wt on the Clark Fork all the time.
  14. David Loy Senior Moment

    Posts: 2,440
    Wolf Bay
    Ratings: +333 / 2
    IF your goal was a two rod setup, many would advocate a 6wt and a 4wt. You'll read that the 5 doesn't throw streamers like a 6, nor does it throw dries like a 4. Kind of a tweaner. OTOH, I own a few rods and the 5 is perfect often enough. I just got a 3 (two actually, but one is probably more like a 3.5, being graphite) but I think the honest 4wt is the better tool most of the time on small through medium sized water. Any wind and the 3 (or less) is a struggle IMO. Every trout fisher should own a good 4wt.
    (and a 5, and a 3, and a 6.....)
    Kent Lufkin likes this.
  15. Freestone Not to be confused with freestoneangler

    Posts: 2,366
    .
    Ratings: +1,215 / 0
    The only thing I am confused about is that you live in Monroe and fish the Cedar and Snoqualmie almost exclusively? Wow, I hope you work down there or have a romantic interest down there as there is a lot of good water way closer to you.

    In all seriousness, what other weight rods do you already own?
    Kent Lufkin likes this.
  16. gabe0430 Banned or Parked

    Posts: 93
    Ratings: +31 / 0
    The Orvis Clearwater 4wt 8-6 is a great mid-action rod for the price at great for the Sno's. With the Orvis Battenkill reel, its a great combo for the price and what I use. Another good option in that price range is the Cabelas LSI with the RLS reel combo. Both are very nice rods for the price.
  17. Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

    Posts: 3,861
    Pipers Creek
    Ratings: +1,263 / 1
    Buy whatever you want, because you'll be buying more rods in the future. Trust me on this......
    That being said, I'd go with a 5 wt if you don't aready have one. Perhaps a bit overkill for the waters you mentioned, but a 5wt is a super versatile rod wt and can be used for a number of fishing situations as you broaden your angling opportunities in the future.
    Eric Denny likes this.
  18. Steve Unwin Active Member

    Posts: 343
    Edmonds, WA
    Ratings: +93 / 0
    Looks like pretty good deals on the 3,4,and 5wt CT at Cabela's right now.

    Or check out their CGT fiberglass rod, might be fairly versatile in a 4wt from what the reviews say. It is not as well liked as the older CGR model but might be worth a look.
  19. Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

    Posts: 7,138
    Not sure
    Ratings: +1,227 / 0
    I couldn't agree more.

    Being almost exclusively a trout guy with a preference for small to medium moving water and mountain lakes, my favorite graphite for years has been a 5-piece Sage 4wt SP. I liked it so much I bought the exact same rod in both a 5wt and a 3wt.

    I shoulda saved my money though because while the 4wt is nearly the ideal graphite rod for the kind of fishing I prefer, the 5wt is too stout and lacks finesse for smaller fish and the 3wt is too noodly and doesn't have the grunt to handle either wind or larger fish.

    K
  20. Richard Olmstead BigDog

    Posts: 2,494
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +792 / 0
    I'm with the 4-wt folks on this. That seems to be all I use anymore, unless I'm specifically fishing for bruisers or casting heavy flies. I'll still use my 3-wt for dry fly fishing when there isn't much wind, and a 6 wt in the salt, but I fish a 4 more than anything else.

    D
    Gary Knowels likes this.