Help me improve my roll cast

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Mike Monsos, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. mat1226 Active Member

    Posts: 409
    Bellingham, WA.
    Ratings: +28 / 0

    Along the lines of what Pat is saying here, make sure your long leader is close to the surface. (pretty sure JesseJames is doing this with his double cast) You can do this by wiggling it up from the depths, where it is basically on the surface. I also like to finish with momentum upward, for instance if two o'clock is behind you, finish up hard toward ten o'clock to ensure all the line is pulled up nicely, before following thru to nine or so, and don't discount the advice on the haul. If all else fails, look for a 20 knot wind coming from your stern.
    Mike Monsos likes this.
  2. Mike Monsos AKA flyman219

    Posts: 462
    Redmond, Washington, USA.
    Ratings: +73 / 0
    Well with all the tips and coaching I have received I think I may just be able to get a long leader and an indicator out more than 20’ with a little luck (and maybe a tailwind).

    Here is what I ended up doing to gain some distance. First off I uplined my rod (7’6” Dickerson 7613) from a 5DT to a WF6 line (I didn’t have a DT6 to try, maybe some time in the future). I also cast more of a Belgian cast like Jesse suggested (I had to look that one up) and lowered my casting stroke a bit to the side. I also introduced a bit of a haul at about the top of the arch on the forward stroke.

    On the grass in the front yard things look promising, we'll see how I do this weekend with the 20’ leader, indicator and chironomid rig.

    Thanks again for all the help!

    Mike
  3. Patrick Gould Active Member

    Posts: 2,356
    Ellensburg, WA
    Ratings: +688 / 1
    I agree. Poly leaders are way underused in my opinion, both the floating and sinking variety.
  4. phblues New Member

    Posts: 5
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    This is a great video to watch for roll casting.

    Mike Monsos likes this.
  5. Steve Saville Active Member

    Posts: 2,482
    Tacoma, WA
    Ratings: +312 / 1
    Practice on the water.
  6. sroffe Member

    Posts: 442
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +16 / 0
    I bought a "Indicator Line" by Rio. Designed for nymphing, but, seems to work well for still water bobber fishing.
  7. Steve Unwin Active Member

    Posts: 313
    Edmonds, WA
    Ratings: +84 / 0
    I bought one too, mainly for stillwater indicator fishing. Makes it super easy to cast a long leader with indicator. Not entirely necessary but I got it for a good price and didn't regret it.
  8. Tom Bowden Active Member

    Posts: 446
    Black Diamond, WA
    Ratings: +72 / 3
    Mike,

    For small stream roll-casting situations, the 7' "Sir-D" taper works well. Wayne Cattanach told me he built a "hinge" into the butt section of the taper to help accelerate the line. Much of the fishing they do in Michigan is on smaller rivers where roll casting is the only option. Those guys are real pros at roll casting.

    I fish with chironomids under indicators a lot. I use my 9' rods for this, as they have more leverage for casting the heavy rig, and for setting the hook on strikes. I recently bought a Rio Indicator line, which is a big improvement for both roll casting and overhead casting. The extra weight at the end of the line really shoots the bobber out there.

    A friend who fishes with me on a local lake has recently been using a 7' 4-wt bamboo rod (of unknown origin) for indicator fishing 12' deep, and doing well. His trick is to use a short line, i.e. the indicator is only 10-20' from his boat. If you're fishing deep, you don't really need a long cast in most situations.

    Tom
    Kent Lufkin and Mike Monsos like this.
  9. Mike Monsos AKA flyman219

    Posts: 462
    Redmond, Washington, USA.
    Ratings: +73 / 0
    Thanks Tom for the tip and the taper you sent me. I had forgot that you have spend a lot of time watching the indicator also. We can talk more about tapers at The Corbett Lake Bamboo gathering later this year. I'll look up some of Wayne's longer 8-9' rod tapers to see what looks like a winner with a hinge.

    Mike