I'll Be Darned, It Works

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by GAT, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 4,231
    Willamette Valley, OR
    Ratings: +2,704 / 0
    As you guys know, I'm continually working on experimental patterns. I'm also into "less is more". Here's a leech (or something) that I tied with one material -- two, if you count the bead.

    I was thinking about a damselfly nymph when I tied the thing. Plus, I figured it might work for warm water critters because they seem to like long, worm-like patterns. I tried it at a local bass pond yesterday that is chuck full of damselflies. I didn't catch any photo size fish but enough different species to consider the pattern a success.

    I use mono thread for this style of fly so the body color shows through. This one is tied on a size 12 hook. The one material that creates the long tail and short body is Golden Olive, Pseudo Hair from Hareline. It is easier to handle than Craft Fur.

    Now that I know this style works, I'll tie some up in black, burgundy and brown.

    Sometimes the experimentals work, sometimes they don't. But it sure is rewarding to create patterns that work. I have a good record so far this years with new patterns. I can't wait to try it for stillwater trout. I have a sneaky feeling they will see it as a damselfly nymph or maybe a leech. It looks great in the water.

    IMG_0013_edited-1.jpg
    KevinLS, Jeff Dodd and DennisE like this.
  2. DennisE Topwater and tying.

    Posts: 336
    Tacoma, Washington
    Ratings: +71 / 0
    Is the hair tied forward behind the bead and then pulled back? Kind of looks like it, anyway, to get that shoulder. Looks good and an easy tie. The body would be a good place to hide a few wire wraps if you wanted/needed more weight.
  3. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 4,231
    Willamette Valley, OR
    Ratings: +2,704 / 0
    Yup, it's tied in my version of a Thunder Creek. You tie the fibers on bellow and above the hook so they are pointed forward over the eye. Then you run the thread to the rear, pull back the upper and lower fibers and secure with thread wraps at the rear. I use the same technique for tying my Pseudo Bass pattern.... except on a much, much smaller scale.

    This is how I attach the fibers for a baitfish pattern... same idea except with a much smaller hook and the same color for the upper and lower fibers. This is where a rotary vise comes in handy.

    404844506.jpg

    And yes, you can add weighted wire to the hook shank to weight the pattern.
  4. DennisE Topwater and tying.

    Posts: 336
    Tacoma, Washington
    Ratings: +71 / 0
    I'll have to try that technique. Could work for SRC squid patterns, too.
  5. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 4,231
    Willamette Valley, OR
    Ratings: +2,704 / 0
    You need to coat the body with some manner of clear coat or locking type fluid. Otherwise, the fish will shred the body fibers. I use either Hard As Hull or UV Fly Finish on the body.
  6. Jim Ficklin Genuine Montana Fossil

    Posts: 2,418
    Columbia Basin
    Ratings: +692 / 0
    I like that look, Gene. Thanks for sharing.