Keeping camera dry

Discussion in 'Photography / Video' started by Evan Sjovold, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. Evan Sjovold New Member

    Posts: 8
    Outlook, Saskatchewan
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Hi

    I haven't done a search for this so if there is another post on this topic forgive me. I was wondering how different forum members who shoot with a DSLR keep it dry and safe out on the water. In particular in a pontoon boat.

    Evan
  2. DennisE Topwater and tying.

    Posts: 336
    Tacoma, Washington
    Ratings: +72 / 0
    I bought a submersible (pentax Optio 90) for use on the water. You might want to check online and see if someone makes an underwater housing for your make and model. You'll also want a lanyard and some type of high visibility float for it. The underwater housing doesn't do you much good if it's under several feet of water and/or floating away and you can't see it!
  3. KerryS Ignored Member

    Posts: 6,769
    Sedro Woolley, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1,788 / 0
    I won't take my dslr on a pontoon boat. I do take it on my sled unless it is raining really hard then it stays home. Not shooting much in a driving rain storm anyway. I have a backpack made for camera gear that is water proof when the dslr comes with me into the field. I use OpTech Rainsleeves (http://optechusa.com/rainsleeve.html) on my camera when shooting in wet weather.
    speyfisher likes this.
  4. creekx spent spinner

    Posts: 362
    Rancho Deluxe
    Ratings: +16 / 0
    Evan,
    For years I carried my Nikon SLR in a hard-shell Pelican case, and now occasionally carry my DSLR in it. Pretty much disaster-proof but heavy. Convenient and safe for boating, but a PITA for walk and wade fishing. I try not to be too worrisome when shooting around water - just careful. Keeping the camera safe in the truck means missing a lot of great shots.

    A few years ago I made a custom camera bag out of a waterproof, roll-top dry bag. I inserted a couple short 4" dia. pvc pipes and some foam padding to custom fit my Nikon. One of the pipes accommodates a lens attached to the body, the other holds a spare lens. I attached a waist belt and wear it at my side. It's readily accessible and I have waded all over hell-and-gone with it without incident (I'm screwed now for typing that...) That said, it is a little hard on my back, so I'm looking into a backpack as an option. For use in the boat it's been great though.
  5. Evan Sjovold New Member

    Posts: 8
    Outlook, Saskatchewan
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Thanks for the info. I was wondering what would work better a pelican case or a dry bag. My scadden boat has a fair bit of room to carry gear. I'm still not sure what to go with. I'm tired of the poorer quality shots from my old point nd shoot b
  6. KillerDave Have camera, will travel...

    Posts: 9
    Tualatin, Oregon
    Ratings: +11 / 0
    IMO there is nothing worse than being an outdoorsman and having a 10yr old camera without a scratch on it. Get it out there, take great shots, beat that sucker up a little!

    I've had both the Pelikan Case & Dry Bag. Every one who has ever owned a Pelikan case has picked it up with the latch unbuckled and spilled everything everywhere. On the water the dry bag is definetely the way to go! I've used a lightweight Sea to Summit Bag for 8 years or so: here's a link: http://www.rei.com/product/752523/sea-to-summit-lightweight-dry-sack-medium

    Always remember to reseal the dry bag! I was float tube fishing in Alaska once, turned around to get the camera and it was gone. A quick scan of the lake reveals my dry bag, floating along about 40 feet away so I kicked over there, picked it back up and everything was fine.

    Put a small towell in the bottom of the bag for padding and to absorb condensation. If you're into carrying and extra lenses or two, get neoprene lens cases for them. Keep it light & simple and you can carry it in a daypack for walking & wading.

    Hope this is helpful. Look forward to seeing your pictures.
  7. Upton O Blind hog fisherman

    Posts: 2,171
    out of state now
    Ratings: +221 / 0
    I would suggest that you not take your DSLR out on the water unless you are willing to take the chance and have it damaged or destroyed. There are a number of really good waterproof cameras that can handle exposure to the water, bring you ease you mind while you're out there and they take excellent photos.