Lingcod Thread

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Steve Knapp, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Smalma Active Member

    Posts: 2,800
    Marysville, Washington
    Ratings: +655 / 0
    I used running line that I had saved from an old cortland line that had neutral buoyancy. I used an Albright knot to connect the running line to both the T-14 and the backing and a nail knot for the leader connection.

    Started with a 30 foot T-14 piece (a couple of us shared the cost of a spool of T-14) and after test casting cut of the appropriate amount (need to do this in steps). I ended up with a 28 foot piece of T-14 which is overlined for the rod but I usually just "cast" it shooting it with a single water loaded back cast.

    tight lines
    Curt
  2. Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Posts: 5,654
    Somewhere on the Coast
    Ratings: +540 / 0
    I notice that Rio now sells the 30' section of T-14 with welded loops on both ends for suggested retail of $39.95. I picked up my 30' section without the factory loops for only $14.95 just a few short years ago. So its more than doubled in price in less than 5 years. The Amnesia was pretty cheap, too.

    So I am making a convertible head system for about $20. One 20' section of T-14, plus a 4' section and a 6' section, all with loops so I can have either a 20', a 24' or a 26' head, for my 6 and 8 wt rods. I won't try to cast all 30' of it on my 8wt, since I already know that's going to be too heavy for my particular rod.

    Of course if I were filthy rich and didn't have the time, I would just go out and spend the $75 or $80 on the Airflo Depth Finder and save myself the hassle of making my own.

    I notice that one can get 15' sections of T-17 or T-20 without loops online for only $11.95. I'm thinking that $12 plus shipping might be cheap enough to find out for myself whether or not I can cast a 15' shooting head. Others tell me that once you cut them less than 25' or so, these heads are "clunky" to cast. Yet I read of others using only 20' and doing just fine. This makes me think that, although it may be an ugly thing to observe, I might be able to actually cast a 15' T-17 or T-20 head.
  3. Joe Smolt Member

    Posts: 532
    Bothell, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +9 / 0
    Hear is something I think is worth adding to this thread; tape your ferrules. I made this mistake last year and cracked a ferrule. When you are flinging big flies and heavy sink tips, you are really shaking things up. Tape em so no section shakes loose.

    I've mentioned this before. I got a 4 piece 10 wt for lings. If it was for home waters, I should have considered a two piece.

    I'm itching to go

    Joe
  4. Joepa Joe from PA

    Another thing to consider is having a spare line or 2. Ling fishing is hard on your fly line (at least for me). I lost a few feet of sink tip several times last season getting my line caught up in wrecks, rock ledges, and kelp.
  5. Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Posts: 5,654
    Somewhere on the Coast
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    A good reason to make your own sinking shooting heads. I couldn't afford to lose a store-bought integrated line at $80 a pop. If I get into this to where I'm losing sink-tips, I might have to buy a spool of T-14 or T-17, or find somebody to share the cost with me.

    Maybe we ought to see if some of us can get together and buy a spool and save some $$ on this.
  6. Steve Knapp Beach Bum

    Posts: 683
    Maple Valley
    Ratings: +258 / 3
    I've thinking about losing lines as well. I wish I had been able to buy the line in bulk, but he shop only had the new 30' packs @ $40. Actually kind of a waste because I'll end up cutting 3'-5' off. I wish I could have paid a little extra and gotten two lengths that would match my 8 wt perfectly.

    Spool is $300 for 5oo feet. $60 each for 5 guys would give you 100' each. I might be able to swing it in a couple weeks if we get some other guys interested.
  7. Chris Bellows The Thought Train

    Posts: 1,628
    The Salt
    Ratings: +754 / 0
    some shops have the large spools and sell it by the foot.

    you could also look for lc-13 (lead core 13 grains per foot) by cortland. i used to fish it quite a bit pre-t-14 and it sank fast and worked great. the drawbacks (kinkyness and memory) are imo exaggerated.
  8. Anil Active Member

    Posts: 1,054
    Tacoma, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +205 / 6
    For anyone interested;
    We have bulk spools of: T-10, T-12, T-14, and T-18. It costs $0.75/foot or if you'd like us to rig it for you with loops it is $1/foot. We also stock 7 different varieties of running lines and three 'integrated' shooting head lines that can work very well for bottomfish. Also, I've been fishing for Lingcod on a fly since 1995 and would be happy to share some advice on lines and flies.
    Anil
    Builder and Matt Baerwalde like this.
  9. Saltman "Just Fish!"

    Posts: 109
    WA
    Ratings: +5 / 0
    T-17 30' head with a AirFlo Ridge 30lb Int Running line......
  10. Rob Ast Active Member

    Posts: 1,904
    West Pugetopolis WA
    Ratings: +231 / 3
    What are you using to throw 30' of T17 ?1?!
  11. Saltman "Just Fish!"

    Posts: 109
    WA
    Ratings: +5 / 0
    A fast 10wt..... It ain't Brad Pitt pretty, but it works :)
  12. Steve Knapp Beach Bum

    Posts: 683
    Maple Valley
    Ratings: +258 / 3
    First set of flies for next week. I'll start on tubes tomorrow, unweighted. I may use small eyes just to keep the hook up and away from snags. Lingcod _017.JPG
  13. Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Posts: 5,654
    Somewhere on the Coast
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    Those are big enough to do the trick. Colors look like what has worked for me using jigs. Most recently, I was using a plastic twirl-tail baitfish about 6" long on a lead jighead that was at least another inch, and that was a little smaller than what the other yak anglers were using. They had red/pink/white plastic monstrosities around 8" long, rigged on what looked to be at least 2 oz, (maybe bigger) heads. I was too busy fishing to go over and ask what they were using until they paddled by me as they were leaving, and then one of 'em held his jig up for me to see.

    I recall that my friend got his 29" "hitchhiker" Ling on a 15" Kelp Greenling he hooked using a sand shrimp for bait. So I think that you can hardly tie 'em too big for the Lings. A 6" fly may be on the smaller end of what is effective. I think that you want 'em big enough to get their attention. If you shake out line and don't have to worry so much about casting a behemoth concoction, then you can present some huge junk to those monsters.
  14. Steve Knapp Beach Bum

    Posts: 683
    Maple Valley
    Ratings: +258 / 3
    Thanks for the insight Jim, I'll tie up a couple big monsters so I'll have a wide spectrum of lengths and maybe add some pink into the mix. Smaller flies should get some rockfish attention anyway.
  15. Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Posts: 5,654
    Somewhere on the Coast
    Ratings: +540 / 0
    Yes, i am going to try some really big ugly jigs next time. At least 8" long.
    I plan to tie up some big flies, too. I still have to get my 8 wt shooting head together (just need to make some loops and I'm done), and I have a reel with backing set up, some 3/0 siwash and some 5/0 octopus hooks, and plenty of tying materials.

    Might have to sneak in tying some trout lake flies and do some lake fishing here shortly, but my go-out along the jetty last tuesday got me fired up for the bottom fish. I had several shallow water hookups with the black rockfish, an undersized ling, and a greenling.
  16. Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Posts: 5,654
    Somewhere on the Coast
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    Steve, I can hardly wait to see your tube patterns.

    I'm also thinking of tying feathers and synthetics onto my jig heads for gear fishing, instead of using soft plastics. Sometimes I wonder where all that lost soft plastic goes.

    Those big flies look like they eat up a lot of materials! The jig head I plan to tie on is going to eat a lot, from the looks of it. I might be able to tie up as many as two of 'em. Lings might rip 'em to shreds. So tying Ling flies on tubes sounds like a great idea if it results in less ravaging of the fly body.

    I'm going to finish putting my shooting head together today!
  17. mtskibum16 Active Member

    Posts: 938
    Puget Sound Beaches
    Ratings: +211 / 0
    I've been thinking about lingcod lately too. Has anyone ever heard of them around the Bremerton area (Dyes, Sinclair, Bainbridge, etc)? I know of some habitat that would seem like a good place for them but haven't heard of anyone fishing for them around here.
  18. Steve Knapp Beach Bum

    Posts: 683
    Maple Valley
    Ratings: +258 / 3
    Unfortunatly, I don't have a good opening day report. Tried for about 3 hours but got completly blown off the water. Apparently checking the marine forecast would have been a good idea.

    Had to call it at 11..... Next time.
  19. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 786
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    I just (yesterday) picked up a Rio Outbound 9i6s (9wt intermediate running line with a type 6 head...) that I also picked up two 15 foot lengths of T-8 (for fishing Kelp beds) and also two 25 foot lengths of T-20 go get down and dirty. I figured I would actually underline my 10wt since the whole rig (line and T-8/20 plus a big fly) would load the rod for what I want.
    If anyone else has suggestions on custom rigging/splicing, chirp in!
    SnoBuster likes this.
  20. Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Posts: 5,654
    Somewhere on the Coast
    Ratings: +540 / 0
    I found some good tips on Dan Blanton's website by doing a search there for "Mix and match shooting heads." He describes how he loops together various lengths of tungsten line to make a convertible system.
    I'm just using the woven mono loops on the ends of my T-14.