Article Salmon on the Skokomish. Good or bad thing?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Rod Wittner, Jul 25, 2013.

  1. Rod Wittner

    Rod Wittner Active Member

    WDFW NEWS RELEASE
    Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
    600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091

    http://wdfw.wa.gov/

    July 25, 2013
    Contact: Pat Pattillo, (360) 902-2705
    Ron Warren, (360) 249-1201

    Recreational salmon fishing on the Skokomish River opens Aug. 3
    OLYMPIA - The recreational salmon fishery on the Skokomish River from the mouth to the Highway 101 Bridge will get under way Aug. 3, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today.
    After several weeks of discussions, state and tribal co-managers agreed to open salmon fisheries beginning in August, said Pat Pattillo, salmon policy coordinator for WDFW.
    Earlier this year, the state and Skokomish Tribe were unable to reach agreement on the fisheries during the annual salmon season-setting process, known as North of Falcon. Since then, the co-managers have continued negotiations.
    "We spent the last several weeks working out the details of the salmon fishery to ensure conservations goals will be met for wild chinook salmon," said Pattillo. "We also worked to structure the fishery to avoid potential gear conflicts between anglers and treaty tribal fishers."
    The hatchery chinook fishery on the Skokomish River from the Highway 106 Bridge upstream, will be open to salmon fishing Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays each week through Aug. 25. Fishing is closed on the other days to avoid gear conflicts, as well as limit impacts to wild chinook salmon, said Pattillo.
    Anglers should note that the fishery above the Highway 106 Bridge gets under way with a two-day opening (Aug. 3-4), and will be closed Aug. 5-8 before reopening on its regular weekly schedule Friday, Aug. 9.
    The hatchery chinook fishery downstream from the Highway 106 Bridge will be open seven days a week through Aug. 25.
    Anglers will be required to use single-point barbless hooks when fishing the Skokomish River, where a night closure and anti-snagging rule will be in effect.
    Sport fishing for salmon on the Skokomish River from the mouth to the Highway 106 Bridge is as follows:
    • Aug. 3 through Aug. 25 - Daily limit two salmon; release chum and wild chinook. Anglers must keep the first two legal salmon and stop fishing for the day.
    • Sept. 15 through Oct. 15 - Daily limit six salmon, up to four adult salmon may be retained. Release chum and chinook.
    • Oct. 16 until further notice - Daily limit six salmon, up to four adult salmon may be retained. Release chinook.
    Sport fishing for salmon on the Skokomish River from the Highway 106 Bridge to the Highway 101 Bridge is as follows:
    • Aug. 3 through Aug. 25 - Open to salmon fishing Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays each week. Daily limit two salmon; release chum and wild chinook. Anglers must keep the first two legal salmon and stop fishing for the day.
    • Sept. 15 through Oct. 15 - Open to salmon fishing Sept. 15, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and Oct. 1-Oct. 15. Daily limit six salmon, up to four adult salmon may be retained. Release chum and chinook.
    • Oct. 16 until further notice - Daily limit six salmon, up to four adult salmon may be retained. Release chinook.
    For more information, see the fishing rule change at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/erule.jsp?id=1337 .
     
  2. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

    I never considered the Skok to be "recreational". LOL
     
    Jim Wallace and dryflylarry like this.
  3. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Combat fishing for food!;) I don't go there (to fish those lower reaches for salmon). I prefer the more genteel fisheries out this way.
     
  4. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

    I remember fishing there with my Dad in the late 70's and very early 80's. Wasn't too bad at all back then. But had to hike in (no road or key access back then that I recall). So only a few of us made that trek. Was a bear carrying to big kings back out. But by the late 80's became a royal zoo. Especially with the natives across on the high bank snagging the fish you hooked. I haven't been back since.
     
  5. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

    When I was young and naive, I went with a family friend to fish for kings on the river. This was long before I picked up a fly rod. I was amazed by the giant green tube that was a continuous flood of fish up river. Then I saw about 1700 people on 1/2 mile of river, most throwing corkies. I'd never seen this type of fishing before and didn't quite understand. Over the next few hours I caught zero fish while fish were being landed all around me. It was only after several hours that I realized that only 1 in 5 was hooked in or around the mouth. And then I noticed that 4 in 5 fish were getting bonked. It made me sick, snaggers all around me, killing fish illegally. I swore I would never go back there and I never fished with that guy again.

    Sent from my HTC_Amaze_4G
     
  6. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    There's plenty of places to find fish without having to go to one of these combat fisheries. Some folks seem to like the relative anonymity provided by a mob scene. I got caught up in a crowded scene on Quillbilly Creek one time about 12 years ago, and left with my limit of 4 hatchery Coho. It was a mob scene. One of my hatchery fish was hooked outside the mouth, but it had a couple of treble hooks stuck in its back. So I kept it, remembering what a hatchery worker once told me about how he and other hatchery workers just hated it when fish with trebles stuck in their backs came into the hatchery. It presented a handling hazard.
    (Tribal fishery going on at the same time amongst the recreational fishers, and the tribal members were allowed to snag their fish with trebles. They were filling up plastic garbage cans with coho).

    It was a mob scene, for sure, but I went back the next day and legally caught my legal limit of 4. I went home with 8 coho packed in ice in my cooler. I felt fortunate, but also a bit disturbed by the whole deal.
    When I got back home, I drove around and gave 6 of them away to non-fishing local friends, and felt a little better.

    The next time I went there, I was trying to cast a fly to a pod of coho, when some toothless quillbilly hurled his snagging rig right into them and nailed one in the back. He horsed it in, and said "Sorry to catch yer fish, yuk, yuk," and took off.

    I went downstream and found a small run with nobody on it. Suddenly two other anglers appeared and stood on either side of me, crowding me, and even casting over my line. There was really only enough room for one. I got pissed off and left. Never going back!

    I'm surprised that we don't hear of more shootings in regard to this nonsense.
     
  7. Peyton00

    Peyton00 Active Member

    I hit the Skok every year. I fish away from the crowds. The fish in this system are big, bright, and plentiful.
     
  8. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

    I'm always glad places like the Skok are open for fishing.......it saves a lot of other great places to fish be free of the ladders, poopers and flosser crowds.
    The idiots have ruined much of that river for those who fish it within the regs.
     
  9. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

    I fished the Wallace down by the mouth one time in November looking for Chums. It was a zoo. Snaggers galore to say the least. I fished for about 5 minutes and said the hell with this. I left, I didn't really like the walk along the railroad tracks to get there. No room to walk when a train came by. People were keeping everything. Light dark, it didn't make any difference. This was in the area where they were trying to spawn. Sickening to say the least.
     
  10. Shad

    Shad Active Member

    The shame of it is that those Skok fish are good biters (at least, that is, before they have had 50 lines draped across their backs). Guys who work to get below the snaggers can do quite well. It's getting harder and harder to get below the snaggers these days. Don't think I'll be back.

    Jim's story about the Quilcene (aka kill scene) reminds me of my last experience there. That estuary used to be a good bet for catching fresh coho on stripped streamers. Last time I tried that, I got threatened by two of the local goobers who told me that by standing in the tidewater, I was preventing fish from moving into the river (where they were easy to snag). I got called a "faggot fly fisherman," among some other choice names. Classy people up there.

    I wrote a letter to the local enforcement officer about my experience. His reply sounded like that of a beaten man. He said they had tried to crack down on the snagging there, but the fact it's legal for the Tribe to snag made it impossible. Seems anyone who marries into the Tribe or is in any way related to a tribal member can assume that same fishing right, so lots of the local trash simply say they have tribal rights when confronted. He suggested I fish elsewhere. Pretty crappy.
     
  11. shanem

    shanem New Member

    Wow this really bums me out. A friend I work with, her family has riverfront property on their farm that is about 3mi up from where the Skok crosses Hwy 101. I was thinking about going up there to fish some but might not given these reports. Their property is private so it wouldn't be full of people but now I'm just not sure the fishing would be worthwhile given the snaggers and combat fishing going on down below.
     
  12. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

    If you have access to private property that limits people, I'd fish it for sure.
    The fish are good quality and biters as mentioned. As long as you are above the raging masses down below you should be fine.
    If your co-worker gives access to a bunch of folks, then you might want to pass.
     

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