A River Runs Through It TRIVIA

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by A.B. Langford, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. William Wallace

    William Wallace Active Member

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    Gets me time and time again I hear how this movie ruined fly fishing, please explain to me how.

    Was this movie really about fly fishing? how to cast? proper technique to approach a drift and cast accordingly, etc ?

    I guess I am missing something?? but I have led a sheltered life

    Please explain
     
  2. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    At the time I started flyfishing, there really wasn't that many folks interested in that sort of angling.... as a result, the flyfishing only fisheries in Oregon were fairly limited in the number of fishers.

    I don't think the movie actually "ruined" the sport but because it popularized it, fisheries that were once fairly sparse suddenly became crowded.

    I... as are some others... were a tad put-off by the sudden influx of water floggers where there were just a few.

    On the flipside... a number of new publications sprung up that dealt with flyfishing and I was able to sell them freelance material.

    I know a lot of flyfishing freelance guys who told me they would have gladly gave up the increase in freelance sales in favor of the sport remaining as it was and not so heavily populated.

    I guess it just depends on your view of what the sport was and what it became. I can see the good and bad of the impact of "the movie".


    58366875.jpg
     
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  3. William Wallace

    William Wallace Active Member

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    Thanks GAT,

    I see your point of view. I just looked at the story line and then it had some fly fishing in it. It reminds me of my father, brother and I throughout the years.

    Again thank you for giving your view.

    William
     
  4. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    That's the deal. Following the movie, there were suddenly so many wanna-be Brad Pitts on the banks, the quiet part of the past-time was gone, maybe forever. I was an instant curmudgeon at 32.

    About the same time a heretic invented some kind of bat to use in handball courts, and there went the neighborhood. You had to join a snotty club instead of playing for free under the tennis courts at U of O.
    There's a Willamette Valley stab from the past for you, GAT.

    There was a pair of old farts at the club I had to join that had T-shirts which read "A woman should do her serving from the kitchen".

    And that's why I hate the movie, not the story. If you like McLean, also read Logging, Pimping, and Your Friend, Jim in the same collection, and his other book, Young Men and Fire.

    Oh, some of us use still the Turle knot on up turned-eye steelhead flies.
     
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  5. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    As I mentioned, some good things did come from the huge influx of fly anglers. Fly tying products and gear probably gained the most. When there wasn't as many customers, the advent of gear and materials improvements were slow to evolve. Once "the movie" created thousands of additional customers, improvements came about quite quickly.

    There is no doubt in my mind that "the movie" helped create the Golden Age of Fly Tying.
    Never before was there so much in the way of materials and tools to pick from. Everything from hooks to chicken feathers vastly improved. The flies tied today are far and beyond better than those tied before "the movie" caused the interest in flyfishing and tying.

    And of course, many, many more start-up companies started selling rods, reels, vests, personal floating craft, waders and boots.

    So really, the only downside was the sudden crowding conditions on the rivers and lakes ... sure it's selfish to want it all for a limited number but that's the way it was before the popularity of the sport skyrocketed after the movie hit the theaters. Some of us old guys were accustomed to very few others on flyfishing only fisheries and we suddenly felt over-ran. The movie was held to blame.

    I remember fishing The Metolius before "the movie" and it was rare to see more than a handful of other fly anglers on the river. So, there was lots of space and you felt a bit of a solitude while fishing the river. That quickly evaporated right after Robert Redford caused an avalanche of new flyfishers. The Met became so crowded, I stopped fishing it.

    Damn that Robert Redford :D
     
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  6. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    Bimini twist... yup, for sure a BT. Anil showed me that effing knot 3x prior to a Key West trip and I could not even begin to start one two days later. Whoever is responsible for that horror of a knot is demented.
     
  7. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Anyone who comes up with a knot that requires you use a knee to tie the sucker should be shot! :D
     
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  8. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    When I fish the Blue Ribbon river's here in Montana. I have the river's to myself after Labor Day. I don't even fish the same river's in the summer time, to crowded.
     
  9. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    IIRC Visa Card ran an ad back in the late '60s or early '70's with a lovely bamboo rod, a nice reel and a colorful fly. A fellow tied the fly on the leader and cast the fly out in a delightful loop and the fly settled on the water. That was, to me, the beginning of the influx of new blood into the sport. The move came along to bolster the sport as the
    interest began to stablize.

    I believe that he used a cinch knot in that commercial.

    As far as the River knot, I have no idea of what it is. I like the granny knot on all of my lines. Saves cleaning fish.
     
  10. FT

    FT Active Member

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    A fellow by the name of Jason Borger did the majority of the casting that you see in the movie. This was accomplished by a bit of slight-of-hand with Jason's casting being what you see through the use of what was dubbed "shadow casting". Jason did the actual casting on the river and a blue screen was used by the actors to mimic the casting motions of Jason with a rod and reel in their hand, but no line, in the studio. Then movie magic editing was used to make it look like the actors were laying out those beautiful loops on the river.

    For the close-up shots of actors on the river, the actors were doing the casting, but if you notice when watching the movie, there was always a slight "break" when it moved from a close-up to wide-angle shot of the casting, or vice-versa.

    My problem with this movie has nothing to do with the increased interest in fly fishing that it generated because I happen to think that was and still is a good thing. My problem with the movie is that the fly fishing sequences are usually very unrealistic, but those who have never fly fished, or have only fly fished a very little, don't know that. They think this is the way it should be done.

    I also have a problem with movie making it seem like a good fly fisher is able to go forth and catch some pretty impressive trout provided he has the proper fly. And of course, it has to be a dry fly.

    Yes, the casting is excellent, which I would expect and would have been very disappointed if it hadn't been so due to Jason's great skill. But the fishing sequences are not realistic, as any of us with a few years of fly fishing experience know. And we also know that dry flies, especially standard dry flies tied in the Halford and Gordon traditions of supposedly imitating mayflies, are not very likely to result in large fish being hooked that are shown in the movie on rivers of that type. A large Salmon Fly Stonefly, October Caddis, Hex Mayfly, Eastern Green Drake, and similar large flies can and do result in such large trout being taken on dries. But when was the last time you saw, or heard, about a large 4-5 pound (or large like the movie) trout being raised and caught on a standard #14 dry fly in a free-stone river?
     
  11. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    I wouldn't doubt that to have been fairly routine during the time frame the story took place.
     
  12. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    True, but the rate in which the father and sons were knocking off the fish, there ain't any remaining :D

    The movie was a movie. Flyfishing wasn't really the point so of course the casting was exaggerated and hardly what you normally see when actually flyfishing. I know I don't stand up on a boulder and cast out my entire line when fishing a fast-moving river (not that I could nor care to).

    I was surprised that flyfishing suddenly became popular because of the movie. Unlike On Any Sunday, a movie dedicated to all the aspects of riding motorcycles, this was a movie that revolved around a family and the interaction of that family in rural Montana... flyfishing was really a small part of the plot and not the point. They could have been spin fishing instead of flyfishing and the story would have remained the same.

    But it wouldn't have looked as cool if a guy was standing on a boulder and tossing a worm and weight a country mile into a river. :)

    As the effectos of "the movie" wore off, the popularity of flyfishing has declined significantly. Most likely because those who took up the sport because of the movie discovered it isn't nearly as easy as the movie indicated and fly casting takes quite some time to master. Plus, fly pattern selection is usually a little more complicated than what you happen to have hanging on your fedora and certainly not limited to dry fly fishing.

    It was a movie about a family, not a flyfishing documentary. Evidently a lot of folks who decided to take up flyfishing because of what they saw in the movie missed that point.
     
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  13. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Perhaps the changes in the fishing environment have cause some to pause or decline to take up the silk line and limber heartwood.

    Cost of gear has exploded! There is a intimidating amount of gear out there and casting is not as easy as chucking a chunkalead and worm out with an inexpensive spinning reel on a fiberglass rod. Marketing has gone pretty much to the high end with trips to exotic places to fish for a week or extended time. Access to good water is a premium and usually will cost more than a day at the park with planted fish.


    Of course there is an up side to that also. Gear, while being more expensive, is also technically advanced. Albeit, some still prefer the
    old school bamboo rod and/or a semi soft fiberglass rod.

    The idea in my books however, is to enjoy a trip with rod and reel and let the chips fall where they may.
     
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  14. JE

    JE Active Member

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    Agreed. Not sure the movie captures it, but I love McLean's written imagery of Paul shadow casting from the boulder. The fly being cast so that it suspends precariously close to the water's surface and hungry trout is such a cool metaphor for how Paul is living his life. The artistic soul flirting with disaster - good stuff. I wonder if people have actually tried shadow casting, that would be pretty funny.
     
  15. ceviche

    ceviche Active Member

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    Turle. If you notice how his wrist twists and the movement of his fingers, it's clear he's forming a slipnot--the first knot formed before passing it over the fly to secure the loop over the shank behind the eye, thus completing the Turle. For me, the giveaway movements were how he first pushes the loop through the bight to initially form the slipknot and then the fingers of one handing hold open the loop while the other hand sets the choking/cinching part of the knot.