Backpacking stove

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by Gary Knowels, Jul 19, 2012.

  1. Siskiyoublues

    Siskiyoublues Member

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    A different kind of option for areas where fuel is available. I've wanted one of these little guys for a while for stream side coffee on a long hike.
    http://www.emberlit.com/default.php
     
  2. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    The "Pocket Rocket" works fine! About $35-$40. Light.
     
  3. Dan Nelson

    Dan Nelson Hiker, Fisher, Writer, Bum

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    The criteria you list include:

    • Entry level
    • Budget
    • Good condition (which I take to mean reliable)
    You don't mention how many people will be served with the stove but I'll assume it will be 1 or 2 most of the time.
    There have been some good suggestions listed above. There are MANY good stoves that are affordable, reliable and durable. For what you want, I'd recommend sticking with a cartridge stove (isobutane) as they are cleaner, easier to operate and less finicky due to the extremely clean-burn nature of the fuel.
    jetBoil makes some great products, including the new Sumo model suitable for 2 or 3 campers.
    http://shop.jetboil.com/index.php/sumo-cooking-al.html

    The Pocket Rocket is a great stove, and the latest generation is even lighter and more compact than the original. But I actually prefer a stove that's freestanding rather than mounted atop the fuel can.

    This is my current favorite "standard" backpacking stove: The Primus ExpressSpider - $70
    http://store.primuscamping.com/backpacking-stoves/single-fuel/butane/expressspider-w/windscreen/

    If you do want to stay ultralight, go with a canister-mounted stove like MSR's PocketRocket:
    http://www.rei.com/product/660163/msr-pocket-rocket-backpacking-stove

    Or better yet, MSR's MicroRocket:
    http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/stoves/rapid-cooking/microrocket/product

    If geeking out on components floats your boat, look to the SnowPeak LiteMax Titanium.
    http://www.snowpeak.com/stoves/backpacking/litemax-titanium-stove-gst-120.html


    All of these are great, durable, reliable stoves. I've used each and every one of them.
    What's more all are good brands with a variety of good products. If you are looking for used, include these brands in your search criteria and you will have better luck.
     
  4. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Thanks everyone! Ed so graciously gave me an old campingaz stove because he is a gear whore and had a couple extras. My piecemeal gear setup is starting to come into shape! I can't wait to get out on some trips.
     
  5. wik

    wik Member

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    caldera cone tri fuel works with esbit alcohol and wood.
     
  6. Alex MacDonald

    Alex MacDonald Dr. of Doomology

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    You might take a look at what sort of stove is legal in the forest now; my Kelly Kettle won't pass muster, and I'd be willing to bet the liquid stoves won't either due to the priming requirement. All this depends on fire restrictions though. Another thing to remember is the canister stuff, although folks say won't work as well in cold weather, works fine all year round here. In sub-zero temps it can give problems, but how often do we get to -8 degrees?

    If Kelly made a titanium version of their small kettle, and I didn't need to worry about that fire in the base (regarding fire restrictions) I'd go with that if you're only boiling water. But those are big "ifs"!
     
  7. Vladimir Steblina

    Vladimir Steblina Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working

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    That's a good point.

    I remember lighting my Svea 123 while backpacking in the Ventana Wilderness in California. I was still in school, majoring in Forestry.

    I was in my sleeping bag when I lit the stove and it flared up. I looked around and all I could see was dried leaves. Holding the bottom of the stove in my hand, hoping that it would not get hot all I could think of was "this was NOT going to look good on my resume".

    Now all you have to worry about is paying for the cost of the forest fire. If anything flies, just declare bankruptcy at the front end and save everybody the trouble. If nothing flies, your homeowners and liability insurance might cover it if your lucky and have plenty of insurance.
     
  8. dfg

    dfg Member

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    Wouldn't it have been easier to take the leaves out of your sleeping bag?
     
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  9. wa_desert_rat

    wa_desert_rat Active Member

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    I bought an Optimus 8 in 1972 and have been using it ever since. Does require priming and that can be tricky but with experience it's not a big deal. I'm pretty sure it will last 100 years. It looks like a square box when it's closed up and pretty easy to pack. Expensive new but probably a zillion of them in garages all over the PNW.

    Craig
     
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  10. sroffe

    sroffe Active Member

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    Some of the older canister type stoves you can't get fuel for any more. I have a Globe Trotter that uses the canister. It punctures the the top, and you have to use all the fuel before changing it out.

    I replaced that one with a little stove by SOTO. It's just a little burner that screws directly onto a canister. It's nice and convienient. Packs into my pots and pans real easily too.

    I also have a MSR Whisper Light. It has two basic settings. Off and HOT!
     
  11. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Mumbles hooked me up with a campingaz canister top stove a bit back. I did a test run that night and it boiled a pint in just a few minutes. used it camping twice now and and more than happy with it, especially for the price :D
     
  12. Patrick Gould

    Patrick Gould Active Member

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    That's my favorite stove, it'll last forever. Make sure to take the canister to bed with you on cold nights. They put out less BTUs when cold.
     
  13. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Thanks for the tip, it wasn't cold when I was camping, but will try to remember to in the future!
     
  14. Dan Nelson

    Dan Nelson Hiker, Fisher, Writer, Bum

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    Warming helps, but there are a couple more important keys to keeping your canister stove firing in freezing temps:

    1. CHeck your fuel. Make sure you are buying isobutane or -- better yet -- isobutane/propane blend fuel canisters rather than pure butane. Iso stays gaseous at lower temps than butane, and iso/propane is good at even colder temps. Remember, the key to canisters is that the fuel is already in a gaseous state when it leaves the canister and hits the stove (that's why the fuel line doesn't run through the flame like it does on a liquid-fuel stove -- that flame-heated fuel line is there to heat the fuel to a gaseous state).
    2. Turn your fuel canister upside in cold weather. This won't work on a canister-mounted stove, (which is yet another reason it is a good idea to buy a free-standing stove) but the upside down stove will still draw fuel, even though it might a liquid state fuel. It it initially spurter in the stove, but eventually, the stove will heat up the fuel line as it approaches the stove and the stove will work perfectly even in deep sub-zero temps.
    SnowPeak and MSR have the best isobutane/propane blends in their canister. Currently I think they run thus:
    MSR: 80% isobutane, 20% propane
    Snow Peak: 85% iso, 15% propane
     
  15. TROUTsniffer

    TROUTsniffer Member

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    i have a soto od-1r (i think thats the model) it's canister and it has a built in piezo ignition. works great for mountain house meals, and is regulated if you want to cook on an actual pan it works decent too...it's also nearly as small as the msr pocket rocket