Confused about "Sinking Tip Lines"

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by wlai, May 22, 2013.

  1. Darryl Pahl

    Darryl Pahl Active Member

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    Full sink or similar lines for the most part only come in 4+ weights, typically 5+ for the heavier lines. So for me I used a 5wt on a 5wt rod for the Type IV full sink, and string up my 3wt with 3wt or 4wt floating line for any dry fly / emerger action. They are different enough rods and approaches to provide entertainment value for the lakes I fish.

    As GAT points out, a fast action rod would be completely fine with over-lining.
     
  2. Richard Olmstead

    Richard Olmstead BigDog

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    Bear in mind that there is a lot of personal preference expressed in the above posts. Those preferences come from a lot of experienced lake fishermen, too. Read that to mean that there isn't a single best solution (although all are pretty much opposed to using a sinktip line in stillwaters).

    There will be plenty of times when you will want to have a floating line for fishing lakes. The lakes are starting to warm up and there will be plenty of bug action on the top with fish looking up to take dries or emergers fished in the surface film or top 2-3 inches. I always carry a rod with a floating line with me in my tube starting about now and through the summer. On relatively shallow lakes, it may be the only rod I'll carry. With a longish leader (11-12 feet), and a weighted fly, I can even fish to a depth of 3-4 feet easily enough.

    However, in colder water and deeper lakes, I'll want to have a sinking line, and may carry only that when fishing winter or early spring. There are times when an intermediate (usually clear in today's market) line will be ideal, but there will likely be times when you want to fish deeper, without waiting all day for a 1.5"/sec. line to get deep. In those circumstances you will want a type III or denser line.

    If you are just getting into fishing lakes, and already have a floating line, I would recommend getting a type III sinking line. If you string two rods when you fish a lake, one with a floater and one with a type III sinker, you can cover the depth that an intermediate line would reach, but an intermediate won't do the surface or very deep easily.

    Denser lines (e.g., type IV or V) are for fishing quite deep. They are more difficult to cast, hard to fish anywhere but deep (for the most part), and are, in my opinion, more specialized in their application. For the urban lakes (and many other lowland lakes) you mentioned wanting to fish, I wouldn't go for a line like one of these.

    So, my long-winded preface leads to my opinion, which is to get a type III sinker and carry it AND you floating line strung on separate rods. If you only have one rod, and so need to pick one line as an alternate option to your floater for fishing lakes, you might consider a clear intermediate, but even then I think a type III sinker would be just as useful.

    D
     
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  3. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    The reason we use the super fast, full sinking lines is because some of the lakes we fish are quite deep. If my fish/depth finder is indicating the fish are hugging the bottom... which is quite common during the cold of winter and the heat of summer... I use my fastest sinking line.

    I don't have the patience to wait a half hour for a medium speed sinking line to reach the holding zone at the bottom of the lake.:)
     
  4. TaylinLoop

    TaylinLoop Many fish coup

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  5. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    I know Denny... he PhotoShops all the fish he catches to make them look larger in the photos... :D

    Just kidding. Anyone who uses a SuperCat the same as I do is tops in my book! We SuperCat stillwater flyfishers stick together and have a secret handshake:)
     
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