Fin clipped coho question

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Stonefish, Sep 22, 2013.

  1. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Anyone know where a Puget Sound coho might be headed that had both the adipose and one pelvic fin clipped?
    Just curious after watching a fellow WFF member catch one this weekend with two clipped fins.
    Thanks,
    SF
     
  2. Fishcounternw

    Fishcounternw New Member

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    These fish are part of a delayed release program at Minter Creek (200k) and the Squaxin Island netpens (80k). The intent is to encourage residulization in PS to support year-round coho fisheries. The delayed release program has been in place for years but the differential marking now give us the ability to document success (or failure). Currently little information exist regarding contributions from the release groups. Hopefully this will change.
     
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  3. Matthew Gulbranson

    Matthew Gulbranson Resident Swinger

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    I was going to guess Squaxin fish. Sounds like fishcounter has the correct info :)
     
  4. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    FCNW,
    Thanks for the info. I'm familiar with the resident coho program as I grew up in the south sound.
    What I was trying to determine is where this particular fish was headed. Do they clip the opposite pelvic fin to distinguish between Minter and Squaxin fish?
    SF
     
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  5. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    My dad lives right across from the other side of squaxin, opposite from where they have the net pens. he regularly paddles out in his canoe and buys a couple from the indians who net in front of his house. I will ask him what he see's for clipping on those fish next time I talk to him.
     
  6. nailbender

    nailbender Active Member

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    Brian, I think it was the right pelvic fin.

    Doug
     
  7. ten80

    ten80 Active Member

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    I caught one with a clipped pelvic fin (and perhaps adipose as well?) on the Sol Duc a couple years ago, but don't remember what Peninsula hatchery program that corresponded to.
     
  8. Fishcounternw

    Fishcounternw New Member

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    The delayed release fish are vertral fin clipped not pelvic. Cant recall what side per hatchery but I'll check.
     
  9. formerguide

    formerguide Active Member

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    FYI, ventral and pelvic fins are the same, just different nomenclature. Most guys I know refer to them as ventral on salmonids.

    Dorsal, adipose, caudal, anal, ventral, and pectoral.

    $.02

    Dan
     
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  10. Cruik

    Cruik Active Member

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    Sure it wasn't a steelhead? The Snider Creek broodstock steelhead program used to (it's gone as of a couple years ago, right?) have adipose intact, ventral clips.
     
  11. ten80

    ten80 Active Member

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    Totally sure, looked like the coho in my profile pic, except pectoral fin was clipped. By "ventral" are you referring to the fins by the head that I refer to as "pectoral," or the fins by the vent which I think are usually referred to as "pelvic?"

    Found an interesting study that shows survival is not affected by "ventral" fin clipping in Chinook... I find this to be fairly surprising!
    http://www.fws.gov/columbiariver/publications/VENTRALFINCLIP.pdf
     
  12. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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  13. ten80

    ten80 Active Member

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    Found a pic
     

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  14. Cruik

    Cruik Active Member

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    Hmmmm. That guy is definitely a coho, minus an adipose and a pectoral fin. I wonder if it came off at the hachery or naturally? But I was referring to the ventral or 'pelvic' fin. The Snider creek steelhead on the Sol Duc have the ventral fin clipped, but not the adipose. You can see my confusion. That's a bright fish, too. Was that a summer coho or was it in the fall?
     
  15. cook

    cook Member

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    Interested in this thread and thinking about it with my fairly limited experience with Coho. On a weeklong trip to Alaska last year, we were limiting almost daily, but these were Summer Coho and part of a harvest hatchery system they're using in SE Alaska (from what I was told) Basically these Coho behave like sockeye in that they first run to lakes, sit for a while, then do their final spawning migration in the feeder streams in the fall. Where I fished, these Coho were intercepted on the first stage of their migration through a fish ladder, gassed, gaffed, then bled and packed for consumption (They show up at local groceries stores as Snow Pass Coho). We fished them staging and in the rivers and they bit all day long. I'm wondering whether these summer fish were more active because of the different nature of their migration. Also, I was wondering if there are other summer runs like this in WA?

    When I returned, I fished for staging Coho in Dabob bay--casting to similar numbers of fish but nothing biting. Moved up to the mouth of the Quilcene and fished out on the estuary at low tide--nothing. Only people I saw catching were those either snagging or flossing on the river.

    (thought I was posting on the lights out thread--doesn't totally apply here, but would still love to know about summer coho/fall coho in the sound)