Rod for Montana

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Sterling Woodsman, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. Red Arch

    Red Arch Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    95
    Location:
    Lower Mainland or Interior of BC
    follow what comp anglers do, take two rods, and when wading or fishing have the other one in your waders rigged and ready.

    Just make sure you keep your fishing rod away from the one in the waders when you have a fish on.
     
  2. Sterling Woodsman

    Sterling Woodsman Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    1
    I don't understand what you mean by have the other one in your waders. How does that work?
     
  3. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Messages:
    4,387
    Likes Received:
    3,718

    Already got one rod in my waders, rigged and ready (except for those really cold days), so there is really no room for another.
     
    Dipnet likes this.
  4. Eric Candelaria

    Eric Candelaria Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    Parker, CO
    A lot of great advice. My first question though is what water are you planning to fish and when are you going? Makes a big difference in what rods and lines I take with me in the boat....
     
  5. Red Arch

    Red Arch Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    95
    Location:
    Lower Mainland or Interior of BC
    Basically what you do is rig up two rods. One dor nymphs/streamers etc... take the rod you are going to use second and put it down the front of your waders to the wading belt or just past. I ptefer my left side, putting it towards my left leg.

    When the time comes to switch just put the fly on the hook keeper, grab the other rod and switch. Takes at max 30 seconds or so! Also you have your other rod wih you and wont leave it on a random bank

    And yeah as Nick said it doesn't work in winter.
     
  6. cebe

    cebe Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2011
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    cleveland, ohio
    An alternative to rigging and bringing two rods is to bring a relatively fast action 9' 5wt and fish dries and smaller waters with a DT5F line and windy days and bigger waters with a WF6F line. I think most fast rods these days can easily handle the higher line weights. If big streamers are your bag then also pack a Wulff 5 wt Ambush line, which will carry a pretty big fly with minimal false casting. I use a Scott 9' 5 wt STS when fishing Montana and carry the DT5 and WF6s on spools with me all the time. I am sure that with this strategy of various lines you can come up combinations for rods and lines that will best fit your situation and minimize the gear you have to carry on the stream. Good luck in Montana, you will have a great time even if you only have one rod and one line.
     
  7. Red Arch

    Red Arch Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    95
    Location:
    Lower Mainland or Interior of BC
    Imho packing two rods is better then a one rod with two lines. If conditions change he doesnt have to take the time to reel in his line, change spools, restring, and retie a fly.

    That being said I am assuming there are two rods?

    I will also be going to Montana this year during early july. I am bringing the whole shebang, 3#, 6#, and 8#. And if I have one by then a 10' 3#
     
  8. cebe

    cebe Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2011
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    cleveland, ohio
    I see your point Red Arch, I wasn't assuming that he was changing back and forth all day to meet conditions. Usually when it gets windy it is windy for a while and taking the three or four minutes to change doesn't seem that long. Now if there is a fish rising then three minutes is an eternity! I do have one question, if it begins to rain and you have to put on your raincoat then how do you handle the second rod if you want to stay and fish? Does it stick up through the top of your raincoat? I have gotten rained on in Montana a number of times on an otherwise kind of sunny day. I have at times carried a second rod but never tried keeping it in the front of my waders, thus the extra spools instead of a second rod.
     
  9. Red Arch

    Red Arch Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    95
    Location:
    Lower Mainland or Interior of BC
    Yeah thats where the extra rod is a handicap...

    In that case then yeah extra spools would be the best option.
     
  10. cebe

    cebe Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2011
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    cleveland, ohio
    I am going to try carrying and spare rod that way though. There are times when I wished I had another rod rigged totally different.
     
  11. Hem

    Hem Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2008
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    Three Forks, Mt.
    The 9'-6 wght. is the best do-all size.It covers the gambit from fishing dries,nymphs,streamers,wade fishing/boat fishing,wind,etc. etc. If you have the means to match scenarios then by all means take other rods and have fun,...but the 6 is the all-around rod for a fisherman trying to keep it simple but also prepared for anything.
     
    Old406Kid likes this.
  12. silvercreek

    silvercreek Active Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    318
    Here's a thought.

    Modern graphite fly rods can handle several line weights. I've used a 7 weight line on a 5 weight rod. It slows down the timing of cast BUT it is doable.

    A fly rod has two functions. The first is to cast a fly and the second is to fight the fish.

    If the fish you are after can be tamed with a 5 weight fly rod, but you will sometimes need a 6 weight line to cast the flies you want to use, I suggest that you don't absolutely need both a 5 and 6 weight fly rod. Take the 5 weight if that is what you will be using most often and take as second spool for your reel with 6 weight fly line.

    Fly fishers get confused about fly rod action and fly rod power. First they think that going up a line weight makes the rod a slower action fly rod. Not so! The rod is still the same action and has the same flex pattern but the timing for casting equal lengths of line changes when you change the line weight.

    Secondly, rod power is NOT rod action. It is a combination of rod action and rod length.

    I wrote a piece for NAFFF on fly rod that explains the differences between fly line rating, power, and action.

    http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/f...rod-line-rating-power-action-explanation.html
     
    Kyle Smith likes this.