Trucha de México?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Teenage Entomologist, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. Brookie_Hunter

    Brookie_Hunter aka Dave Hoover

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    http://www.utexas.edu/tmm/tnhc/fish/research/truchas_mexicanas/

    Here's a website about them that shows their known distribution. For years now, I've thought that it would be a neat trip to make to search these guys out but with all the drug violence in Mexico these days, especially in the vicinity of where some of these streams are located, I haven't pursued it any.
     
  2. Teenage Entomologist

    Teenage Entomologist Gotta love the pteronarcys.

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    The illustration is from my old 2013 trout calendar. The artist is Joseph Tomerelli.
     
  3. Jeremy Floyd

    Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

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    Thanks!

    I had the idea, and Kirk did the photoshopping..
     
  4. Jason Rolfe

    Jason Rolfe Wanderer

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    Someone needs to start a Seahawks/Superbowl photoshop thread. I would, but I know nothing about photoshop.
     
  5. David Dalan

    David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

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    Yeah, hes the illustrator of the book i have.
     
  6. Kyle Smith

    Kyle Smith DBA BozoKlown406

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    Fly fishing high Mexican desert sounds like a very rattlesnakey time. Also sounds like a fun winter getaway for anyone with the cojones to do it. I'll stick with Eastern WA and the Bitterroot, and maybe New Mexico one day.
     
  7. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Yeah, I'd pass on tramping around in the hills South of the border. Food for thought though.
     
  8. ptychocheilus

    ptychocheilus New Member

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    Actually, yes.

    The website that Joe T maintains is the best source of info out there on these fish. Supposedly some of the areas are safe, or at least as safe as they were back in the early and mid-2000s. They're not all tiny -- we got fish to a bit over 18", and I saw a gargantuan fish in a deep canyon in the [mumble, mumble, mumble] drainage. Many pops have the basihyal slash of cutts, but genetically they're more closely related to rainbows.

    That Conchos fish is a weird one. I may have gotten the first specimen ever on a fly (though a colleague wormed one up the day before).
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The Raramuri have been fishing them for ages, not always with hook and line -- if there was a big boulder in a pool, there would almost invariably be a big log next to it. We blew them off as just being flood-borne debris until a local kid (our guide for the day!) ran ahead of us to a pool, stuck the log under it and rocked the boulder. A trout and two mountain suckers floated out from under it, partially stunned.

    There's some very pretty water up in them hills, but also some crazy bad roads, bridges that were held together with baling wire, and a lot of... umm, interesting people.
     
  9. Teenage Entomologist

    Teenage Entomologist Gotta love the pteronarcys.

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    That makes me want to go there all the more.
     
  10. Robert Engleheart

    Robert Engleheart Robert

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    My Dad did stream surveys in the Central & Northern Mexican Sierra Madre Occidental in the 1930's. Caught some trout, all small. He talked more of the Turkey, deer and waterfowl hunting.
     
  11. ptychocheilus

    ptychocheilus New Member

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    That would have been a neat time to be kicking around that area, what with imperial woodpeckers and all sorts of other cool critters still around. That predated Needham's expeditions into the region by a bit... if you have any additional info on the specific areas he visited, I'd be very interested--particularly if it included anything south of the Rio Acaponeta!
     
  12. rory

    rory Go Outside

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    Who wants to plan a trip?
     
    constructeur likes this.
  13. Robert Engleheart

    Robert Engleheart Robert

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    I'm lacking details, dad passed away in 1986. I know he spent several years int the areas shown on this map:
    http://www.utexas.edu/tmm/tnhc/fish/research/truchas_mexicanas/pub/jpg/trout_localities.pdf
    I believe he was HQ'd between Durango (Parral, specifically) and Chihuahua and would take a team of a couple Mexicans into the sierra for 3 weeks a month, come back to town and report/resupply. Said it was the best job he ever had. Met some very interesting folk, including descendants of Confederate soldiers who fled to Mexico rather than live under "Yankee" rule. GAE_1932.jpg

    My Dad, Circa 1932
    I remember seeing huge flocks of Parrots (Macaw?) nesting in trees, was told they flew up from coastal lowlands to escape the heat. Also some large woodpeckers, may have been imperials, but can't be sure.
    Who are the Raramuri? Indigenous people? My father got to know some of the Tahrahumara(sp?) and other (Mixtex); very interesting with different language and dialects. His father was doing the same thing further south, between Irapuato and Durango in 1908-1920 +/-, so they very likely were familiar with the area south of the Acaponeta. I know a reservoir/generating powerplant my grandfather built west of Morelia is still on-line, with one of the two original turbines he installed in 1910 still operating.
    He did speak of trout, but was more focused on bass in the reservoirs they built and especially the waterfowling, which was outstanding.
    I'd be very cautious about going there now, with the narco element and so forth, without very good local knowledge. It's rough country even without that element.
    Lovely pictures, ptychocheilus, how recently were you there?
     
  14. David Dalan

    David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

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    Alas, some of the streams are in pretty remote areas used by some pretty awful people. But the risk of getting your head chopped off, is a bit thrilling, no?
     
  15. Teenage Entomologist

    Teenage Entomologist Gotta love the pteronarcys.

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    This is some very interesting stuff.