With hat in hand, I come seeking information

Discussion in 'Warm Water Species' started by Olive bugger, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. Shawn West

    Shawn West Active Member

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    It looks to me like you are set as far as fly rods are concerned. There are a couple of factors that determine which rod I am going to use.

    1) Fly pattern
    2) Structure in the water

    I suppose structure would be my first priority. A Simiseal Leech, tied on a size 8 Dia Riki 710 hook, is one of my go to patterns for bass. I can, and do, fish this fly on my 2wt rod. If the lake has a lot of weeds, I would be foolish to even try using a 5 wt to fish the leech. Heavy cover equals heavy rods. You need the extra backbone of a heavier rod to muscle those bass out of that cover. When you hook a decent bass, you can bet that is exactly where they are going to go. Where I fish, Columbia Gorge ponds on the wet side of Washington, the primary structure is boulders. I can get away with fishing my 2wt or 5wt rods. As far as I can recall, I have never lost a smallie to the boulders. One note on fishing with a 2wt. It can be a hoot fighting smallies up to about 14". Any smallie larger than that, and you are at the mercy of the fish. All you can do is be patient and hold on. My largest smallie to date on my 2wt is 18.5". I was happy I caught it, but I definitely needed a sturdier rod. If I was not in open water, I would have definitely lost that fish.

    Fly patterns have already been discussed. Size and weight of your fly will determine what rod and leader/tippet to use. You do need to get the fly to your target with minimum effort. I typically use 0X for most of my flies. As stated earlier, bass are not leader shy. I will go with 2X or 3X when using my 2wt. For my sinking and sink tip lines, I use about 3 feet of 0X. If I could only fish one pattern for bass, it would definitely be a bugger/leech pattern. I have caught them on just about any color imaginable. That being said, I prefer black. My second go to pattern would be a Clouser. White/Chartreuse is a deadly combination.

    Be sure to let us know how you do with the bass next year.

    Shawn
     
  2. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    One of the lakes that hold smallies is close by and rather large. I can think of two that fit that bill. I would guess that the big mouths will be in the weeds and the smalies will be over gravel. Is this correct?
     
  3. Jim Ficklin

    Jim Ficklin Genuine Montana Fossil

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    Depends on the time of year . . . both will be on rock in the Spring. Later, LM will frequent veg cover more readily than SM. On this side, I start hooking LM on gravel/in shallows that warm quickly before I ever find a SM.
     
  4. chewydog

    chewydog Active Member

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    OK niemeyer, what is this material...innertube?

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Brad Niemeyer

    Brad Niemeyer Old School Member

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    Yes, a bicycle inner tube works best as it is thinner and more managable, but I tie these with regular rubber bands and the colored rubber bands that you find holding broccoli stalks together. Makes a nice segmented body and sinks well. Wolly bugger will catch bass but these really work well. I caught a 5 pounder on an all orange one. I call them RubberBandit™ worms. Now if I could just sell the pattern to orvis or umqua or somebody!
    Green&blueBanditWorms.jpg
     
  6. chewydog

    chewydog Active Member

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    Thanks. Had to ask, because that fly looks absolutely "catchy" to me. Downside is...now I have to eat broccoli and such...
     
  7. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Nice looking flies, Brad. Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. Derek Day

    Derek Day Rockyday

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    My favorite smallmouth technique is fishing floating flies (rainbow trout looking crease flies, with a wiggly tail) on a full sink line off a +/- 12' leader. Cast and let your line sink to the bottom. Then strip it back in 4-5 strip pulls. This wil pull your fly down towards the bottom, super erratically. Then stop you retrive and let the fly 'swim' back to the surface. You'll see a little dimple on the top as your fly surfaces, then WHAM. They'll smash it on the top. It's a really cool way to catch them, and super effective.
     
  9. soundflycaster

    soundflycaster Member

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    Bass are not leader shy for the most part. I will use 12# when working around lots of weeds and salad to keep break offs to a minimum. A short stout taper is all that it needed, heavy in the but to turn over the heavy flies. Hooks from 1/0 to 4 are fine as bass have tough big mouths. As far as flies just about any streamer / baitfish patterns will work. The worms shown above will work well and can be dead sticked or fished very slowly. I also tle worms from braided yarn of different colors with cone heads or jig style heads. Deceiver saltwater patterns also work well.

    For a rod I like a fast 8' 8wt. This type of rod is more of a saltwater taper for punching wind, turning over big bugs and casts in the 40'-60' range. I will use a 8,9or 10wt WF line that I have cut off the front 2-3' as I do not need as gentle a taper. I do not do hardly any false casting with the bigger line wt, just a pick up an shoot.
     
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  10. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    That sounds like something I would like to try. Thanks for the info guys.
     
  11. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    Size of the fish is only a small part of choosing the right rod. If i were serious about pursuing smallies. I would buy a boat with a front flat deck and a foot controlled trolling motor. In my opinion you can't do it without that.. I'd be rigged up with 6_ 10 weights. Not for the size of the fish but fly the flies I'd be throwing... The largest of tarpon flies would not be too big. T17 30 foot shooting heads would not be excessive. As far as i know there are no serious smallie fly fishers on the Columbia. Basically find out what the guys in the sparkly boats are doing and copy it with a fly.
     
  12. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    I am sorry that post wasn't very helpful.. I'll post something better and more informative tomorrow.
     
  13. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Thanks for the input. I am thinking that maybe some lake fishing.
    Haven't seen any really big hogs except in Lake Washington, and they were Large Mouth.
    An 8 weight rod would not be too large for that, for sure.
     
  14. Patrick Gould

    Patrick Gould Active Member

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    I also have a Predator 8 wt that I use for big bass bugs. It works great and lets me imitate the my gear fishing style with the fly rod.

    This year I also had a great time going the opposite direction and using my 2wt. I went to small to small flies like damsel nymphs and classic top water patterns. It amazing how many little .5-1.5 lb bass you can lure in with a slow patient retrieve. Small poppers seemed to be better for tricking the bigger fish.

    Stan Coffin lake, near Quincy, is managed for Bass and seems to be much less crowded than the trout lakes nearby. It might make a nice getaway during a gloomy west side spring.
     
  15. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Thanks for the input Patrick. I would like to make it over in the Spring or summer months for some fishing. Perhaps I could send you an email and we could meet for lunch and maybe some rod bending.

    If that is ok with you.